Cole

** IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The Fairview Library Theatre is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic; please follow updates on the Toronto Public Library website.

We will mount our production of “Enchanted April” as soon as we are able, followed by “Cole” as circumstances allow.

We will contact our subscribers and ticket holders to rebook their seats as the situation becomes clearer.

We thank you for your patronage, and look forward to entertaining you again once this is over. 

Devised by Alan Strachan and Benny Green, Musical, words and music of Cole Porter.

Here is a fresh musical tribute about the king of musicals, Cole Porter. The show includes most of Cole’s hit songs with a narration which tells the story of his life, from Yale to Paris to Manhattan to Broadway to Hollywood – and – ultimately back to Broadway. Includes such Porter songs as – Anything Goes – Begin The Beguine – Night and Day – I Love Paris and many more.

“In a way no other songs of the period did, Porter’s created a world.” – Vanity Fair

Enchanted April

** IMPORTANT NOTICE:

The Fairview Library Theatre is closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic; please follow updates on the Toronto Public Library website.

We will mount our production of “Enchanted April” as soon as we are able, followed by “Cole” as circumstances allow. 

We will contact our subscribers and ticket holders to rebook their seats as the situation becomes clearer. 

We thank you for your patronage, and look forward to entertaining you again once this is over. 

A Comedy Drama by Matthew Barber from the novel by Elizabeth von Arnim.

When two frustrated London housewives decide to rent a villa in Italy for a holiday away from their bleak marriages, they recruit two very different English women to share the cost and the experience. There among the wisteria blossoms and Mediterranean sunshine, all four bloom again – rediscovering themselves in ways that they – and we – could have never expected.

2003 Tony Award Nominee—Best Play.
“ENCHANTED APRIL is as good as they come: a lush, thoroughly refreshing theatrical holiday. Escape has seldom seemed so sweet. A magical triumph.” —LA Times.

 

The Gentleman Clothier (Jan 30 – Feb 8, 2020)

Experienced gentleman’s tailor Norman Davenport has barely opened the doors of his new clothing store when Sophie, an exuberant young woman, barges in looking for work, followed by Patrick, a single father who claims to be handy. Norman hires then both to help tie up the last few threads before his Grand Opening. And whether Norman realizes it or not, he needs help getting into the twenty-first century. Disappointed that he feels he is being forced to cater to the latest fashion trends, he makes a wish that changes his life forever.

“a tailor made play that will not only fit you like a glove, it will transport you to a bespoke world that will keep you in stitches.” – Theatre Orangeville

A Gift to Remember (Nov 28 – Dec 7, 2019)

A comedy by Joseph Robinette, Based on the book Can This Be Christmas? by Debbie Macomber.

On Christmas Eve, during a snowstorm, a group of strangers all hoping to arrive at their destinations in time for Christmas find themselves stranded, due to a snowstorm, in a small train depot.  Understandably disappointed and dispirited they try to make the best of things with little success at first.  Eventually, however, they begin to bond despite their circumstances.  They even find themselves beginning to accept their fate by finding ways to celebrate the true spirit of Christmas.  As the former strangers become collective friends, they realize the memory of this night will be a gift to remember.

Awards: The Charlotte B. Chorpenning Playwright Award

Spider’s Web (Oct 3 – Oct 12, 2019)

Clarissa, the second wife of Henry Hailsham Brown, is adept at spinning tales of adventure for their bored diplomatic circle. When a murder takes place in her drawing room she finds the drama much harder to cope with, especially as she suspects the murderer might be her young stepdaughter Pippa. Worse still, the victim is the man who broke up Henry’s first marriage! Clarissa’s fast talking places her in some hair raising experiences, as she comes to learn that the facts are much more terrifying than fiction…

“Suspense, anyone? The old fashioned kind? Who’s for good, clean fun? One is Agatha Christle’s 1954 puzzler, The Spider’s Web.” – Howard Thompson, The New York Times

To Kill A Mockingbird (May 16 – May 25, 2019)

Our season closes with To Kill a Mockingbird, a dramatization of Harper Lee’s 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning masterwork of honour and injustice in the Deep South and the heroism of one man in the face of blind and violent hatred. One of the best-loved novels of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than forty million copies worldwide, and served as the basis for an enormously popular motion picture.

It’s 1935, and racial tensions are high in Maycomb, Alabama. Nonetheless, young Jean Louise Finch – or Scout, as she is fondly called – manages to live a rather carefree, priviliged existence, insulated from issues of race. All that changes when Scout watches her father, Atticus Finch, defend an innocent man, Tom Robinson, against a potential death sentence, which looms threateningly against him because of racial prejudice. Scout learns that “growing up” often means doing what is right, even when it comes at great cost. To Kill A Mockingbird is now considered an American masterpiece.

Blue Stockings (March 21 – March 30, 2019)

A moving, comical and eye-opening story of four young women fighting for education and self-determination against the larger backdrop of women’s suffrage. Cambridge 1896, and Girton College, home to the country’s first female students, is an object of annoyance and derision to the rest of the university. The year’s intake of new women face economic difficult, the distractions of men, radical politics, and the jaw-dropping prejudice that blights every aspect of academy life. Meanwhile, there looms the prospect of a controversial vote to decide: should these ‘blue stockings’ be allowed to graduate? While skilfully invoking its Victorian setting, the play’s themes of gender equality and the power of education are just as important today.

 

“Cracking… leaves you astonished at the prejudices these educational pioneers had to overcome.”  ~ Michael Billington, Guardian

 

“Touching and entertaining… Swale tells the story with both wit and a hint of righteous indignation.”  ~ Charles Spencer, Daily Telegraph